Thoughts on cybersecurity from Krishnan Chellakarai at Gilead Sciences

Thoughts on cybersecurity from Krishnan Chellakarai at Gilead Sciences

I spoke to Krishnan Chellakarai about his thoughts. He is currently the Director, IT Security & Privacy at Gilead Sciences and has been a security manager at several biotech firms in the past. One thing he is concerned about is the increasing threats from IoT. He gave me a theoretical example. “What happens if you are reading your emails on your Apple Watch and you click on a phished link. This could lead to a hacker gaining access to credentials and use this information to stealing information from your network.” As users bring in more Fitbits and other devices with Internet access to corporations, “every company needs to worry about this threat vector because it is a foot in the door.” This is part of a bigger trend, where “we have less data stored on individual devices, but there is more access” across the corporation. What this means is that there is “less visibility for IT security pros in case of an exploit.”

Certainly, some of the responsibility with keeping a firm’s infrastructure secure has to lie with each individual user. Chellakarai asks if “people ever look at their Gmail last account activity in the right bottom corner?” Or do we ever click on the security link that pops up when you are signed in to your account from multiple places? This is food for thought. “IT managers need to put some common sense controls in place so they can have better network visibility,” he says. Another example: when was the last time anyone checked their printer firmware or other legacy devices to ensure that they have brought up to their latest versions. “It is time to stop thinking of security after an app is built, and start thinking about security from the beginning, when you are planning your architecture and building your apps.”

Chellakarai says, “One of my first things when I start working for a new company is to do a data analysis and network baseline, so that I can understand what is going on across my infrastructure. It is so critical to do this, and especially when you join a company. I look at policies that aren’t being enforced and other loopholes too. Then I can prioritize and focus on the risks that I find.”

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