Freelancing tip: collecting your clips in one place

One of the best things that I ever did was put together a website that had links to all of my clips. Granted, this in 1995 when the Web was young, and many pubs didn’t have online versions. But now everyone is online and it is a lot easier to do.

Why should you build a clips site? Because you need a reference to your body of work. When you pitch a new editor, he or she wants to be able to quickly go someplace and review your clips and see how and what you write. If you have it all nicely arranged online, you make getting new work easier. All they have to do is look you up your website online and read your previous work.You can also use this website as a handy reference for what you should be pitching too. Finally, you also increase your Google juice and drive additional traffic to your work, which is helpful these days where everyone is counting page views.

What should you use? I use my own hosted WordPress site, and it is a good tool to learn anyway, since many sites now employ it themselves. You can take a look at my site here, and see that I have separate pages for each publisher, and then I also put up a new post whenever one of my articles is published. You can add keywords to make it easier to find particular subjects too and demonstrate your expertise in particular topic areas. I also add a short summary, or maybe the first paragraph of the piece, in my post. If you get a blog on WordPress.com, it is free of charge but then you are limited to their templates. If you want something fancier, you can run a WordPress site on your own domain for a few dollars a month, as i do.

But sometimes putting links to online stories isn’t enough. A lot of pubs have come and gone, and so for the articles that you really care about, take a moment after a piece is published and produce a PDF copy of the piece (If you have a Mac, this can be done easily through the print dialog box.  If you have Windows, there are utilities that can help too. Then put this pdf in a folder that you can retrieve later when the link dies, and post it to your website.

If you don’t want to build your own blog site, there are other alternatives that are free. Editorial-for-hire services such as Ebyline, Contently, and Skyword all offer this feature, and they also might notify you when a piece is posted so you can add it to your portfolio. Here are links to mine:

Note tthat you can create a custom URL in the Contently and Skyword portfolios, which is a nice touch. I went overboard with my page in Contently, putting more than 400 article links together.  I think they have the best of the three systems. Not sure that after you have more than 25 stories in your portfolio if it really matters, but if you are going to use one of these services for your actual portfolio, then you should maintain it. I still recommend you set up your own clips website outside of these systems for complete control and just in case one of the services goes out of business or changes things on you.

The hardest part about building your clips website is just getting started. Once you have it running, adding a new clip won’t take more than a few moments.

Ways to Watch Your Freelancing Rate

I have been in the freelancing business for 25 years and have seen a disturbing drop in per-word rates, especially in the past couple of years. I remember when $1 per word was considered the middle of the road for an established IT writer. Now it seems like the top of the heap, and in some cases almost unattainable. I frequently get asked to write for ten cents a word, or even less.

So my suggestion to freelancers is this: Try to work for the editors that you respect that will pay you the most per word.  In the long run, this will make you the most money.

In order to do that, you need to know how much work is involved in creating the kind of article that you will be asked to write. This means understanding how much research and reporting is needed; and for that you need to be careful about your own limitations and understand the process of how a story gets constructed.

These days research almost always means looking stuff up online and spending time clicking and reading various websites. That isn’t too hard, but it can get time consuming. The good news is that this research isn’t limited by anything other than your own curiosity and time. Sometimes you don’t understand something and really could talk to a live person to clear things up and you need to do some reporting.

Reporting is where the time can get away from you. I recently wrote a story where my editor asked me to get a quote from a source at IBM. I was working with the right PR person (which for a big company like IBM can be a challenge in and of itself) and she was doing a great job hooking me up with the right expert. Except it was taking too long. I couldn’t file my story until I had this quote: weeks went by before the stars were in alignment and I could do my interview. So, be prepared in some instances research can take far longer than expected, and you should account for this when you decide to accept an assignment. And don’t take your client’s word for how accessible a source could be: oftentimes they don’t realize what is involved in securing an interview and obtaining a quote.

Finally, don’t forget my advice about accounting for the number of edit cycles that a client may have in store for you. That should be reflected in your contracts and your rates. Don’t be shy about requesting a heavy surcharge for additional edit cycles, because that can eat up your time quickly.

How to Know When to Write

have been a freelance writer for more than 25 years, and before that, a professional trade journalist for another six years. Over the years my income has varied but always been very comfortable. I have written magazine articles for most of the major IT pubs, created dozens of websites, and written three books, two of which have been published (and let’s just say the results were less than stellar).  Over that period I learned a few important lessons about being a freelancer that I want to share with you. Here is one biggie:

Find your best time of day to write, and protect it.

I am a morning person, that is the way it is. I am most productive in the hours before 10 am. On all of my books, most of the major writing was done in the early morning hours. You need to listen to your body’s biorhythms and follow them. If you have an article to write and it is the wrong time of day, put it aside until tomorrow. Don’t try forcing the words on the page. You will be more productive.

Maybe you have never thought of your writing in this fashion. I know when I first began to do freelancing, I was a bit lost. What do I do first? How do I put together a pitch proposal for work? You have a lot of things competing for your time. So, structuring what you are planning on doing is critical.

For the next week, keep a short journal and note what you spend you time on during each day. Start paying attention to when you can write with the fewest distractions. Do you need to turn off your email, not answer your phone? Shut down a few windows on your computer? Whatever it takes, it is time to focus.

Finally, keep track of ideas. You can use a journal, or have a Word doc that you annotate. Your editors are always looking for new ideas, and it is helpful to have a ready supply of potential pitches.

Now make sure to schedule your “writing time” so that you don’t have other things going on that invade this important part of your day. Dentist or doctor appointments? Visits with friends? Keep them, certainly, but schedule them around your best and most productive moments.

Avoid Rewrite Nightmares: Keep the Edit Cycles to a Minimum

One secret every freelancer has to learn is the writing part of the job pales by comparison to time needed for work to be edited. I have worked for very good and very bad editors over the years. From the best editors, I have learned how to sharpen my writing and improve how I frame particular ideas. From the bad ones, I have learned patience and, well, read on.

There are some clients that just can’t seem to help themselves and have to rewrite almost everything from top to bottom. To avoid getting trapped in these situations, you need to be crystal clear about how your work will be treated once it leaves your computer. Some clients think they are better writers than you, others want to show to their bosses that they have added value to your work.

Now, my contracts are very explicit about this process. I put in language that exactly says I will perform one edit cycle: I write it, the client makes comments, and I submit the final version. If they want to go back and forth endlessly, I charge more.  In some cases, a lot more, such as two or three times my original rate. That usually gets my point across: the editing is almost more time consuming than the original writing. If you don’t have a standard contract, now is the time to look around onlineand modify one that will suit your purpose.

I am not saying that every word that I create is precious and needs to be in the final piece. Just that I enjoy writing, not fiddling with syntax and word usage.

It also helps to have a clear idea of who is going to be involved in the actual editing process itself. Sometimes you get stuck between two editors, one who undoes the changes of the other. Insist (and in writing too) on a single point of contact at your client and have them consolidate and filter all the requests for changes to you. Otherwise, you go nuts with this back-and-forth. And put that in your contract too.

With some writing projects that I have done, I wanted to get multiple comments from reviewers very quickly into my draft, almost happening in real-time. For these situations, I have used one of the real-time editing tools such as Google Docs or PiratePad.net. Both tools reflect requested changes with a scrolling chat window and different colors to represent each person’s changes. But you have to know your client very well to implement something like this.

If all else fails, then don’t work for these clients: They can make you work much harder  for an end product that isn’t always superior. In the end, you will be happier and enjoy the writing process more if you limit the number of edit cycles and approvals up front.