Authentic8 whitepaper: Why a virtual browser is important for your enterprise

The web browser has become the defacto universal user applications interface. It is the mechanism of choice for accessing modern software and services. But because of this ubiquity, it puts a burden on browsers to handle security more carefully.

silo admin console2Because more malware enters via the browser than any other place across the typical network, enterprises are looking for alternatives to the standard browsers. In this white paper that I wrote for Authentic8, makers of the Silo browser (their console is shown here), I talk about some of the issues involved and benefits of using virtual browsers. These tools offer some kind of sandboxing protection to keep malware and infections from spreading across the endpoint computer. This means any web content can’t easily reach the actual endpoint device that is being used to surf the web, so even if it is infected it can be more readily contained.

Authentication for the next generation

mobileThe new “my way” work style and the demand for on-the-go access to any service from any device and virtually any location requires that you bring your best encryption game with you when you’re on the move. This is especially true for the group of people often labeled Gen Y, or 20-somethings. Why? Because they are so digitally native and so used living their lives with instant access to their money, their friends, really anything that they do. As they are so steeped in technology, they tend to forget that there are lots of folks online who want to steal their identities, empty their bank accounts, and cause other havoc with their digital lives. But Gen Y is also more likely to use mobile banking than their elders, and more likely to go elsewhere if banks do not offer the mobile services they desire.

For a white paper for Vasco, I wrote about the challenges around providing better and more native authentication technologies for Gen Y and indeed, all users.

ITworld: A get-up-to-speed guide on hyper-converged infrastructure

The market for hyper-converged systems is quickly evolving. Traditional storage infrastructure vendors remain the largest installed base, but software-defined and hyper-converged storage providers represent the fastest growing market segment, with some of the latter vendors rapidly increasing their market share.

ITworld: A get-up-to-speed guide on VDI

Virtual desktop infrastructure, better known as VDI, is undergoing a new life. A few years ago, it was plagued by lackluster user experiences and cost overruns. Now, thanks to an injection of new technology and better implementations, there’s a lot to like. Faster, cheaper technology has made it an interesting option for companies seeking a way to support flexible, work-from-anywhere environments.

How does this transformation happen? This get-up-to-speed guide posted on ITworld explores how VDI can help organizations navigate shifts in business, and user needs.

ITworld: A get-up-to-speed guide on moving legacy apps to the cloud

Making a case for moving legacy apps to the cloud is becoming easier, with the biggest driver being the ability to shift costs from capital to operating expenses, which can save money. Also, renting capacity rather than owning servers and network infrastructure allows more flexibility in how computing resources are provisioned, enabling workloads to be matched to demand. Quick provisioning is key: New servers can be brought up in the cloud in just minutes, not only making it easier to improve availability but also enabling more flexible disaster recovery mechanisms.

This get-up-to-speed guide explores the key approaches to migrating legacy apps to the cloud, and the value each can bring to your business. You can download my guide here.

Hyper-Converged Storage from DataCore Virtual SAN Software

DataCore’s comprehensive storage services stack has long been known for harnessing ultra-fast processors and RAM caches in x86 servers, for superior performance and enterprise-class availability. It now comes in a compact, hyper-converged package that is ideal for transactional databases and mixed workloads. DataCore Virtual SAN software is available for a free 30-day trial. It runs on any hypervisor and your choice of standard servers.

We tested DataCore Virtual SAN in May 2015.

Pricing:  DataCore-authorized solution providers offer software packages starting under $10,000 for a two-node, high-availability cluster, including annual 24×7 support.
Requirements: Windows Server 2012 R2

For information on DataCore’s SANsymphony-V Software-defined Storage Platform, check out our other video here.

And for a copy of our white paper on hyper-converged storage, download our paper here.

 

VMware blog: Simplifying Storage Solutions

Storage has seen its share of technology changes in recent years, but the most significant breakthrough isn’t higher capacity arrays, it’s the shift to software-defined storage. One of the reasons many enterprises are embracing this new paradigm is that in recent decades, managing storage has been a specialized skill set which has fostered organizational silos among other issues.

In this free e-Book that I wrote for VMware, I explore:

  • How virtualization and cloud management impact storage management
  • Implications of the control plane transitioning from hardware-centric to app-centric
  • The role of VMware hypervisor in managing storage

White paper: A Blueprint for Securing Mobile Banking Applications

lock-and-key-icon-thumb355812Mobile banking has the opportunity to become just as disruptive in the modern era as ATMs were back in the 1970s. From the convenience of our own homes, and with our own devices, we now have the opportunity to do just about everything except get cash from our bank.

I have been a mobile banking customer for the past several years. As an independent businessman, I get paid with a lot of checks from my clients. It used to be a chore to walk on over to the ATM to wait for a free machine to deposit them. Now I rarely visit the ATM, and having my bank email me a receipt is a nice touch. Plus, I can quickly pay my bills from my mobile phone too, so I am using my Web-based online banking access less and less. Mobile banking is not just convenient; it’s a great time-saver!

In this white paper that I wrote for Vasco and is authored by Will LaSala and Benjamin Wyrick, we see the results of some research around what consumers want from their mobile banking applications, discuss some of the current issues surrounding the evolution of mobile banking, and finally, review best practices that will help secure mobile banking apps without compromising user experience.

Taking a risk-based authentication approach to financial fraud protection

iconsOn the Internet, the bad guys are sadly winning the war against banks and other financial institutions. Cybercriminals are becoming more sophisticated, deploying blended threats against banking and payment networks, and using multiple access methods to steal money. Their market share is increasing too. This isn’t good news for legitimate businesses that want to stop money laundering, e-commerce threats, account takeovers, pre-paid debit card abuse and other online banking exploits.

Two-factor exploits (such as Emmental) have also grown, making three or more factor methods more important. And as more banking is done using mobile applications, institutions are faced with more challenging security requirements as customers can authenticate and conduct their business from anywhere and with any device.

In a white paper here, I describe these problems and how using a risk-based authentication approach can protect the entire lifecycle of banking activities as well as satisfy the needs of users for convenient and transparent access to their accounts.

How Lastline has better breach detection capabilities

The Internet is a nasty place, and getting nastier. Current breach detection products using traditional anti-malware sandbox technologies can’t keep up with advanced persistent and hyper-evasive threats that pummel enterprise networks on an hourly basis. Malware authors encode their exploits with a number of operational vectors, so in case one entry point doesn’t work they can still find a way into your network to do their dirty work. And as more businesses hire more outsourced consultants, part-time workers, and employ mobile devices, they open up additional mechanisms for malware to enter their corporate networks.

Some traditional AV and endpoint protection vendors have responded to these threats by adding features to their security products to do a better job of anticipating badly behaving packets coming through their detectors. They make use of limited virtual machines or operating system emulators to view how a piece of malware operates. That is great, but it isn’t enough. Many malware authors can detect when these simulated environments are active and can evade detection accordingly. For example, some exploits such as W32.DelfInj can literally go to sleep for several days to avoid any detector that will just scan an infected system for the first several minutes.

1aWhat is needed is a next-generation sandbox that can correlate a series of particular breach events add IP and object based reputation analysis and do this in near real-time. This is what the Lastline Breach Detection Platform does.  What makes them unique is their range of discovery, the way they can effectively mimic actual PC or smartphone endpoints to examine malware behavior, and how they can scale up to handle very large networks with their modular and SaaS-based tools.

Download my review of their system here.